History Egyptian Stela Fragment carving Sculptural wall relief plaque www.Neo-Mfg.com 7"
History Egyptian Stela Fragment carving Sculptural wall relief plaque www.Neo-Mfg.com 7"
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, History Egyptian Stela Fragment carving Sculptural wall relief plaque www.Neo-Mfg.com 7"
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, History Egyptian Stela Fragment carving Sculptural wall relief plaque www.Neo-Mfg.com 7"

History Egyptian Stela Fragment carving Sculptural wall relief plaque www.Neo-Mfg.com 7"

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History Egyptian Stela Fragment carving Sculptural wall relief plaque www.Neo-Mfg.com 7"

Size 7.25" Tall

This is a replica of the original sculpture in the museum

The original relief in the Museum is a single piece with the queen carved into the stone on one side and a King on the other side

This exquisite bust of a Queen shows the sculptor's complete mystery over his material.
The Royal Vulture Crown offers protection from the goddess Nekhbet.

Nekhbet is frequently represented as a large vulture, flying above the head of the pharaoh. Her wings are usually spread open in a protective gesture, guarding him from his enemies.

Nekhbet is normally associated with the protection of Upper Egypt and she is often portrayed wearing the White Crown of Upper Egypt.

FROM MUSEUM
Small Late Period and Ptolemaic reliefs or sculptures that depict a subject in a partial or unfinished way but are themselves finished objects constitute a special class of object. Guidelines like those for artists are often prominently exhibited as part of the object, although, in fact, many instances can be noted where the object simply could not serve as a suitable model for a traditional formal Egyptian representation. Personifications of kingship, figures that may represent the now emerging demigods Imhotep and Amenhotep Son of Hapu, and popular gods like Harpokrates or Isis are heavily represented within the corpus.

Taken together, the figures represented and the other features indicate the reliefs and sculptures of this class, sometimes called by Egyptologists "sculptor’s models / votives," were the material of a donation practice, perhaps connected with the prolific temple building of these centuries. Unfortunately there is little to illuminate us about the mechanics of such a donation practice.

This small relief shows a female with a vulture headdress, so either a goddess or a queen, the former most likely. On the opposite side is the face of a king which has been left before final smoothing and removal of tool marks.

Period:Late Period–Ptolemaic Period
Date:400–200 B.C.
Geography:From Egypt
Medium:Limestone, paint
Dimensions:H. 18.7 cm (7 3/8 in.); W. 11.5 cm (4 1/2 in.); D. 2.2 cm (7/8 in.)
Credit Line:Rogers Fund, 1907

https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/551285